Rieki and veterans

Veterans for America delivers an early holiday present to our nation’s military families: “The American Veterans’ and Servicemembers’ Survival Guide,” a 599-page guidebook every veteran should own. And there’s no need to worry about being naughty or nice, because the VFA Santa has made the ebook available to everyone as a free download.

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Reiki and Veterans: U.S. veterans are plagued by PTSD, suicidal thoughts, sexual trauma, depression and other remnants of wartime service. Vets can be taught to self-heal using Reiki, making it avaiilable to them at all times. They can access Reiki in the moment, as they feel fear, anxiety or depression building inside. Reiki’s gentle relaxation and mind clearing benefits may see someone through a crisis long enough for them to reach out for the help they need before causing harm to themselves or others.

 PTSD or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is highly associated with our country’s combat veterans- past and present.  Approximately 17% of combat veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan have some form of PTSD and these numbers continue to rise. In addition to these statistics, approximately 3,300 combat troops also suffer from Traumatic Brain Injury. The lifetime cost of treating these aliments is expected to equate to a staggering $35 million.  

I am an OEF/ OIF Veteran that suffered for many years from PTSD. I found holistic lifestyle changes and diet to support my shift, but the biggest benefit was studying and becoming a Reiki practitioner, and using it daily for life management. My love for Reiki tuned me into creating my own company to support Veterans and Military Families using Reiki to facilitate a safe place for them to get back in touch with themselves, be at peace, and allow the healing to occur naturally. Complimentary/ Alternative therapies like Reiki are very important in the whole picture of health and wellness, and are crucial for preventative measures for stress management. As a Veteran, I know that it is important to feel heard, understood, and safe, and that is why I offer Reiki as a Veteran for Veterans and enjoy seeing others doing the same. The more we share, the more we grow! Keep up all the great inspiration everyone, for we are bringing balance into the lives of many. Honorably, W. McGraw

He enjoyed spending time with his family.  Don enjoyed traveling with his wife, Lucy, in northern New England and Cape Cod. He has been a resident of North reading for the past seventy five years and was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

I received my first Rieki Treatment in 1997 which would change my life forever!  In 2008 I had the opportunity through Reiki Rays of Hope and the Alzheimer’s Foundation to take Reiki 1.  This course was offered to caregivers and their families to bring relief to loved ones suffering from Alzheimer’s, a disease my Father suffered from.  The Reiki treatments were comforting to both of us. For my Dad it brought a sense of quiet, calm and peace, I too received peace in helping bring him the comfort and dignity he deserved.  I continued my education through Lakeland Community College becoming a Reiki Master in the fall of 2009.  Since then I have had the joyous privilege of growing my practice and offering healing services to many people. I am delighted and honored to become part of Blue Sky Yoga and Healing Arts.

Lucy turned to yoga at 18, in 2009, while searching for a natural way to de-stress and to manage a severe hyperthyroidism condition. As a result, she immersed herself in yoga, rieki, self expressive healing arts, raw vegan food preparation, meditation, anthropology and numerology. She continues to look for fun and creative ways to maintain and improve her health so that she can enjoy, as well as help others enjoy, a good quality life. Lucy took her first teacher training in 2011 at Red Lotus, focusing on short form Ashtanga & slow flow. Wanting to understand the other side to Hatha yoga, shortly after Lucy trained in Yin Yoga with Lynne Baum at Red Lotus Yoga and in Iynger Yoga with Lucia Romagnoli of the Quercia Calante Yoga Studio in Umbria Italy.

Bibliography

2013 Obituaries. (1970). Retrieved on April 24, 2014, from http://www.croswellfuneralhome.com/obits2013.htm.

About Us | Blue Sky Yoga. (1970). Retrieved on April 24, 2014, from http://blueskyyogaohio.com/about/.

Healing Hands – Reiki and Military Stress | | Mental Health Blog. (1970). Retrieved on April 24, 2014, from https://www.militarymentalhealth.org/blog/2013/03/healing-hands-reiki-and-military-stress/.

Healing Inspirations . (1970). Retrieved on April 24, 2014, from http://healing-inspirations.com/practitioners/michele_love.

Instructors. (1970). Retrieved on April 24, 2014, from http://playatagora.com/instructors/.

Reiki . (1970). Retrieved on April 24, 2014, from http://www.examiner.com/article/reiki-cam-for-mental-health-and-self-healing.

Reiki Wellness Project for Veterans Living With Post Traumatic …. (1970). Retrieved on April 24, 2014, from http://www.hartrock.net/reikiwellnessprojectforvets.htm.

Statistics of disabled veterans

The VA designates some of these veterans as partially disabled, while others are considered fully disabled, depending on the extent of their injuries. The classifications determine how much money they’re paid in benefits, but it doesn’t prevent disabled vets from earning their own money, if they’re capable of doing so.

Veteran Statistics | Homeless Veterans | Veterans Organizations

This section presents statistics on Veterans. Specifically, the data address service connected to disability rating; the prevalence of disabilities in the Veteran population; the portion of the Veteran population that experiences poverty, by disability status; and Veterans’ benefits, by disability status. The principal sources of these data are the U.S. Census Bureau, specifically the American Community Survey and the Veterans Benefits Administration’s Annual Benefits Report.

About 4,500 U.S. troops were killed in Iraq and about 1,800 have been killed in Afghanistan. Some 633,000 veterans — one out of every four of the 2.3 million who served in Iraq and Afghanistan — have a service-connected disability, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

More of the new veterans are women, accounting for 12% of those who have sought care through the VA. Women also served in greater numbers in these wars than in the past. Some female veterans are claiming PTSD because of military sexual trauma — a new challenge from a disability rating standpoint, Hickey says.

What’s more, these new veterans are claiming eight to nine ailments on average, and the most recent ones over the last year are claiming 11 to 14. By comparison, Vietnam veterans are currently receiving compensation for fewer than four, on average, and those from World War II and Korea just two.

March 14, 2013 – Employment of Veterans in the Federal Government These quick facts use data from the 2011 Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch to compare Veteran employment in the Federal Government by agency, occupation, and level of disability. Three of the four charts focus on new hires.

Table 6.2: Civilian Veterans Ages 18 Years and Over Living in the Community for the U.S. by Disability Status In 2012, there were 20,956,421 civilian veterans ages 18 years and over living in the community, 5,598,325 of which were individuals with disabilities—a prevalence rate of 26.7 percent. Mississippi and Oklahoma had the highest prevalence rate, 32.3 percent, while Virginia had the lowest prevalence rate, 18.8 percent.

Number of living veterans in 2012 who served during the Vietnam era and both Gulf War eras and no other period. Other living veterans in 2012 who served during three wars: The number who served during World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam era, 50,004, was not statistically different than the number who served during the Vietnam era and both Gulf War eras.

Do you agree, disagree, or would like to add an opinion on this topic? We welcome articulate, well-informed remarks relevant to the article. Comments are moderated by editorial staff of Disabled World, however we do not verify or endorse material shared by commenters below.

The Department of Veterans Affairs is mired in backlogged claims, but “our mission is to take care of whatever the population is,” says Allison Hickey, the VA’s undersecretary for benefits. “We want them to have what their entitlement is.”

Table 6.5: Poverty Gap – Civilian Veterans Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S. In 2012, the poverty rate of civilian veterans with disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community was 17.8 percent, while the poverty rate of individuals without disabilities ages 16 to 64 years living in the community was 7.4 percent—a poverty gap of 10.4 percentage points. The poverty gap was smallest in Alaska (4.0 percentage points) and greatest in the Wyoming (19.3 percentage points).

Many of these veterans are young people in their 20s who go on full disability for the rest of their lives, putting a huge strain on the VA. Robert Gates, former Defense Secretary, addressed this in 2010.

Bibliography

U.S. Veteran Facts and Statistics . (1970). Retrieved on April 20, 2014, from http://www.disabled-world.com/disability/statistics/veteran-statistics.php.

U.S. vets’ disability filings reach historic rate – USATODAY.com. (1970). Retrieved on April 20, 2014, from http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-05-28/veteran-disability/55250092/1.

Veterans Day: Census Facts | Infoplease.com. (1970). Retrieved on April 20, 2014, from http://www.infoplease.com/spot/veteranscensus1.html.

Veterans. (1970). Retrieved on April 20, 2014, from http://disabilitycompendium.org/compendium-statistics/veterans.

Aaron Smith. (1970). A cost of war: Soaring disability benefits for veterans . Retrieved on April 20, 2014, from http://money.cnn.com/2012/04/27/news/economy/veterans-disability/.

Dorothy (Dore) Glasgow. (1970). National Center For Veterans Analysis And Statistics Home. Retrieved on April 20, 2014, from http://www.va.gov/vetdata/.

Veteran jobs

America’s Veteran is the official website of the U.S. Government, operated by the Office of Personnel Management to help vets find jobs in the federal government. Individuals can search for jobs as a veteran, transitioning service member or family member. There’s a page called “Vet to Vet” where veterans share their stories and there’s also a Facebook Page.

VetJobs: America's Premier Job Board for Veterans

The Veteran Gold Card provides post-9/11 veterans with extra support as they transition out of the military. Once a veteran has downloaded the Veteran Gold Card, he or she can access six months of personalized case management, assessments and counseling at the roughly 3,000 One-Stop Career Centers located across the country.

“Shifting Heroes,” an added component of the Michigan Shifting Gears program, is designed to integrate returning veterans in to the Shifting Gears experience, and help them re-image and re-frame the skills they acquired in the service for jobs in the private sector. Shifting Heroes will provide additional career development support to veterans, and will include one-to-one mentoring by a Michigan veteran, as well as provide opportunities to make direct connections with employers that are specifically interested in hiring veterans and are committed to creating a supportive professional environment for their veteran employees. When veterans sign up for Shifting Gears, they will be paired with a mentor who is a veteran, who will help our Michigan heroes transition to the next phase of their careers. If you have served in the U.S. military and are interested in participating in Shifting Heroes, you can begin the process by going to the Michigan Shifting Gears website.

Visit the program homepage (This link will take you off of Whitehouse.gov) Veterans The Veteran Gold Card provides post-9/11 veterans with extra support as they transition out of the military. Once a veteran has downloaded the Veteran Gold Card, he or she can access six months of personalized case management, assessments and counseling at the roughly 3,000 One-Stop Career Centers located across the country.

Military.com offers a careers section with the “largest veteran job board in the world.” Individuals can search for jobs, create and post resumes, network with other veterans and find nearby career fairs. There’s a list of military friendly employers, including Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Allstate, Walmart and Boeing.

Creating the Opportunity Headquartered in Alpharetta, Georgia, Hire Heroes USA has built a national reputation of excellence for its success at helping unemployed veterans find jobs – currently at the rate of nine veterans confirmed hired every week. Our team is comprised of military veterans – many with combat experience in Iraq and Afghanistan– and business veterans. That mix of military and civilian experience has proven essential to effectively training veterans in the skills of self-marketing, then networking them into good jobs with great companies. The hallmark of the program is a personal approach where each veteran receives dedicated assistance from a highly-trained staff member in order to help them overcome barriers to employment. To become part of this program, click on the tab above that best suits your interest.

Bibliography

6 Online Resources for Veterans Seeking Jobs. (1970). Retrieved on April 15, 2014, from http://mashable.com/2011/05/07/veterans-job-sites/.

Hire Heroes USA | Veteran Jobs | Civilian Careers | Military …. (1970). Retrieved on April 15, 2014, from https://www.hireheroesusa.org/.

Joining Forces Employment Resources. (1970). Retrieved on April 15, 2014, from http://www.whitehouse.gov/joiningforces/resources.

Michigan Veteran Employment Services | Pure Michigan Talent …. (1970). Retrieved on April 15, 2014, from http://www.mitalent.org/Veteran/.

Health issues for veterans

Military service members and veterans face some different health issues than civilians. During combat, the main health concerns are life-threatening injuries. These include Shrapnel and gunshot wounds Lost limbs Head and brain injuries There may also be a risk of health problems from exposure to environmental hazards, such as contaminated water, chemicals, and infections. Being in combat and being separated from your family can be stressful. The stress can put service members and veterans at risk for mental health problems. These include anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and substance abuse. Suicide can also be a concern. Get Veterans and Military Health updates by email What’s this?

The AMA is supportive of educating physicians and other health professionals to make sure veterans get the care they need. Below is a compilation of links from AMA medical journals, and governmental and professional organizations on common health issues that affect veterans and their families—particularly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-combat depression.

Motorcycling newspaper editor Tim King talks veterans health ...

“Folks returning from combat have a constellation of health concerns, including physical issues, psychological issues and psychosocial issues concerning things like work and family,” said Dr. Stephen Hunt, national director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Post Deployment Integrative Care Initiative.

To help veterans, and all Americans, VA health researchers tighten ...

Physical and mental health issues represent a very real barrier for our nation’s service men and women. Returning veterans already cope with the daunting task of re-assimilating into their civilian lives, with health and financial woes further complicating this transition. I have witnessed firsthand the physical, mental, and financial stresses facing veterans across the country.

Improving Ethics in Veterans' Care | Education Development Center ...

As a first step in supporting these veterans, those of us in civilian life can work to close the gap between providers of mental health services and the veterans who desperately need their help. An April GAO report surveyed civilian mental health care providers, finding that only 39% were accepting new patients with veteran’s TRICARE health insurance coverage. For many veterans, this is the only way they can afford mental health assistance, and yet in many regions of the country it can be nearly impossible to find someone who accepts their insurance. It is a significant — and unnecessary — barrier to veterans getting the help they need. On this Veteran’s Day, we should start taking steps to bridge that barrier.

The 28th annual “Independent Budget” — recommendations “by veterans for veterans” for funding and policy changes for fiscal 2015 and beyond — was released Tuesday by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Paralyzed Veterans of America, Disabled American Veterans and American Veterans. The report calls for $72.9 billion in additional health, benefits, claims processing and infrastructure spending for the fiscal 2015 budget, which sets aside money in advance for future fiscal years.

Military service members and veterans face some different health issues than civilians. During combat, the main health concerns are life-threatening injuries. These include Shrapnel and gunshot wounds Lost limbs Head and brain injuries There may also be a risk of health problems from exposure to environmental hazards, such as contaminated water, chemicals, and infections. Being in combat and being separated from your family can be stressful. The stress can put service members and veterans at risk for mental health problems. These include anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and substance abuse. Suicide can also be a concern.

Providing quality care for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan requires an innovative approach that addresses both the physical and mental health of a veteran. We must continue to expand efforts to connect more veterans to mental health resources, beginning by recommitting ourselves to erase the stigma that prevents many veterans from seeking mental health care. We must also ensure that service members are thoroughly evaluated for injuries and properly diagnosed so that, as veterans, they are eligible to receive the care they need for the complex injuries, whether physical or mental, that they have sustained during their service.

Bibliography

After the Battle: 7 Health Problems Facing Veterans | LiveScience. (1970). Retrieved on April 14, 2014, from http://www.livescience.com/8916-battle-7-health-problems-facing-veterans.html.

IAVA . (1970). Retrieved on April 14, 2014, from http://iava.org/issues-and-campaigns/suicide-and-mental-health.

Supporting Veteran Health. (1970). Retrieved on April 14, 2014, from http://www.ama-assn.org/go/joiningforces.

Veterans and Military Health: MedlinePlus. (1970). Retrieved on April 14, 2014, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/veteransandmilitaryhealth.html.

Matthew M. Burke. (1970). Groups: Billions more needed to address veterans’ health care …. Retrieved on April 14, 2014, from http://www.stripes.com/news/groups-billions-more-needed-to-address-veterans-health-care-benefits-issues-1.265947.

Ret. Lt. Col. Steve Brozak. (1970). Veterans’ access to mental health services needs fixing . Retrieved on April 14, 2014, from http://money.cnn.com/2013/11/11/news/economy/veterans-mental-health/.

Veteran organization

Finding Work After Military Service 5.2.12 Health care companies are hiring veterans, even those without any formal medical background. Other industries, like private security, are also seeking veterans.

Veteran Students Organization | University of Miami

Our Spending Record on Veterans 3.12.13 These days, with the economy still in recovery, charities like VSO have to put every donated dollar to good use. See how we’ve spent donated money and how we compared to other veterans’ nonprofits. VA Working to Reduce Veteran Suicides 2.19.13 By adding staff and new public awareness initiatives, the VA is aiming to reduce the number of suicides among veterans.

Purdue Student Veteran Organization - Home

Members of the military community — veterans, active-duty, reserve, National Guard, or their family members — have the opportunity to join or otherwise benefit from several types of associations and organizations. Ranging from fraternal to charity these military specific organizations can provide advocacy, help you network to access job opportunities, tap into benefits, lobby congress, or find support. In addition, the Air Force (Civil Air Patrol) and Coast Guard (CG Auxiliary) which offer civilians the chance to volunteer and contribute to our nations defense, this also includes several official State Defense Forces or Civilian Militias which are also listed here.

Student Veteran Orientation Program - Ball State University

Veterans Get New Education Benefits 5.29.12 Starting in May, many unemployed veterans can apply for new benefits to cover education costs through a federal program that focuses on retraining 99,000 veterans for high-demand jobs. Memorial Day Is Not Just A Day Off 5.27.12 Let’s not forget what Memorial Day is truly about: Honoring the men and women of the Armed Forces who gave their lives in the service of our country.

Why It’s Vital to Give to Veterans’ Causes 12.31.12 What are you doing to help our nation’s veterans? Thousands of veterans need jobs, food, housing and other supplies, and they rely on the public to help them through veterans’ causes and nonprofits. Now is the time to assist them. Donate To Veterans Today. They Need Our Help. 12.17.12 Our government is making a substantial effort to address problems facing today’s veterans. But government can’t do it alone. The public needs to support the work of veterans’ causes and groups – especially at this time of year.

Our Spending Record on Veterans 3.12.13 These days, with the economy still in recovery, charities like VSO have to put every donated dollar to good use. See how we’ve spent donated money and how we compared to other veterans’ nonprofits.

What are you doing to help our nation’s veterans? Thousands of veterans need jobs, food, housing and other supplies, and they rely on the public to help them through veterans’ causes and nonprofits. Now is the time to assist them.

Unemployed Veterans. Are There Fewer of Them? 4.5.13 Latest figures show a small improvement in the number of veterans without work. In February, close to 772,000 veterans were unemployed. Incarceration: Too Often a Revolving Door For Veterans 3.29.13 Many veterans land in prison because of the consequences of their social problems, such as living in poverty, going without work for long periods of time, and abusing drugs.

Saving and Rebuilding the Lives of Veterans 7.23.13 In recent weeks, VSO has hired dozens of struggling veterans and given them the chance to rebuild their lives. Their stories are heartbreaking but also full of hope. We Need To Give Veterans A Reason To Live 6.30.13 About 22 veterans kill themselves every day. If we give struggling veterans jobs, housing and other support, they would have a reason to live.

Congress: Stop Balancing the Budget on the Backs of our Vets Opinion 2013 is on track to be one of the least productive years that Congress has ever had. But even when politicians disagree on most issues, supporting veterans and military families has always been a bipartisan priority. This year, however, not only has Congress failed to pass any major package of veterans legislation, but it is also on track to finish out the year with a big stick in the eye to veterans as one of its last acts before packing up and going home. More >

Bibliography

Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. (1970). Retrieved on April 13, 2014, from http://iava.org/.

Military and Veteran Associations | Military.com. (1970). Retrieved on April 13, 2014, from http://www.military.com/spouse/military-life/military-resources/military-and-veteran-associations.html.

Veterans Support Organization: Helping Veterans Transition from …. (1970). Retrieved on April 13, 2014, from http://theveteranssupport.org/.

Tramatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex injury with a broad spectrum of symptoms and disabilities. The impact on a person and his or her family can be devastating. The purpose of this site is to educate and empower caregivers and survivors of traumatic brain injuries. This site aims to ease the transition from shock and despair at the time of a brain injury to coping and problem solving. Bookmark this site for the latest medical breakthroughs and brain research, the highest quality treatment for brain damage, the symptoms of brain injuries and the nation’s best traumatic brain injury rehabilitation centers and resource information.

Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research: National Institute ...

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as intracranial injury, occurs when an external force traumatically injures the brain. TBI can be classified based on severity, mechanism (closed or penetrating head injury), or other features (e.g., occurring in a specific location or over a widespread area). Head injury usually refers to TBI, but is a broader category because it can involve damage to structures other than the brain, such as the scalp and skull.

Mild traumatic brain injury may cause temporary dysfunction of brain cells. More serious traumatic brain injury can result in bruising, torn tissues, bleeding and other physical damage to the brain that can result in long-term complications or death.

Bibliography

Traumatic Brain Injury. (1970). Retrieved on April 12, 2014, from http://www.traumaticbraininjury.com/.

Traumatic brain injury . (1970). Retrieved on April 12, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traumatic_brain_injury.

Traumatic brain injury Definition . (1970). Retrieved on April 12, 2014, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/traumatic-brain-injury/basics/definition/con-20029302.

Ptsd

Ptsd

The main treatments for people with PTSD are psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), medications, or both. Everyone is different, so a treatment that works for one person may not work for another. It is important for anyone with PTSD to be treated by a mental health care provider who is experienced with PTSD. Some people with PTSD need to try different treatments to find what works for their symptoms.

Post-traumatic-stress Disorder (PTSD): US Military Neglects ...

There is evidence that susceptibility to PTSD is hereditary. Approximately 30% of the variance in PTSD is caused from genetics alone. For twin pairs exposed to combat in Vietnam, having a monozygotic (identical) twin with PTSD was associated with an increased risk of the co-twin’s having PTSD compared to twins that were dizygotic (non-identical twins). There is also evidence that those with a genetically smaller hippocampus are more likely to develop PTSD following a traumatic event. Research has also found that PTSD shares many genetic influences common to other psychiatric disorders. Panic and generalized anxiety disorders and PTSD share 60% of the same genetic variance. Alcohol, nicotine, and drug dependence share greater than 40% genetic similarities.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can occur after you have experienced a traumatic event. PTSD symptoms usually start soon after the traumatic event, but they may not happen until months or years later. They also may come and go over many years. If the symptoms last longer than 4 weeks, cause you great distress, or interfere with your work/home life, you probably have PTSD. Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the event, avoiding places or things that remind you of the event, feeling numb, and feeling keyed up (also called hyperarousal). If you think you have PTSD, it is important to get treatment. There are good treatments available for PTSD — treatment can help you get better.

Dubner and Motta found that 60% of children in foster care having experienced sexual abuse had PTSD, and 42% of those having been physically abused met the PTSD criteria. PTSD was also found in 18% of the children not abused. These children may have developed PTSD due to witnessing violence in the home, or as a result of real or perceived parental abandonment.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is a complex health condition that can develop in response to a traumatic experience – a life-threatening or extremely distressing situation that causes a person to feel intense fear, horror or a sense of helplessness. PTSD can cause severe problems at home or at work. Anyone can develop PTSD – men, women, children, young and old alike. Fortunately, PTSD is treatable. Learn more about PTSD.

PTSD was first brought to the attention of the medical community by war veterans, hence the names shell shock and battle fatigue syndrome. However, PTSD can occur in anyone who has experienced a traumatic event. People who have been abused as children or who have been repeatedly exposed to life-threatening situations are at greater risk for developing PTSD. Victims of trauma related to physical and sexual assault face the greatest risk for PTSD.

If you have PTSD, it doesn’t mean you just have to live with it. In recent years, researchers from around the world have dramatically increased our understanding of what causes PTSD and how to treat it. Hundreds of thousands of Veterans have gotten treatment for PTSD—and treatment works.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such as war, a hurricane, sexual assault, physical abuse, or a bad accident. PTSD makes you feel stressed and afraid after the danger is over. It affects your life and the people around you. PTSD can cause problems like Flashbacks, or feeling like the event is happening again Trouble sleeping or nightmares Feeling alone Angry outbursts Feeling worried, guilty, or sad PTSD starts at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people develop new or more severe signs months or even years later. PTSD can happen to anyone, even children. Treatment may include talk therapy, medicines, or both. Treatment might take 6 to 12 weeks. For some people, it takes longer. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

Bibliography

NIMH · Post. (1970). Retrieved on April 11, 2014, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/.

PTSD . (1970). Retrieved on April 11, 2014, from http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/ptsd.asp.

PTSD | Symptoms & Treatment | Military Veterans | Make the …. (1970). Retrieved on April 11, 2014, from http://maketheconnection.net/conditions/ptsd.

PTSD: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Alliance. (1970). Retrieved on April 11, 2014, from http://www.ptsdalliance.org/.

PTSD. (1970). Retrieved on April 11, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder.

Post. (1970). Retrieved on April 11, 2014, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/posttraumaticstressdisorder.html.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (1970). Retrieved on April 11, 2014, from http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/post-traumatic-stress-disorder.